June 2006 Vol. 104 No. 7 THE REVIEW

Correspondence: Crime, Criminals, and Competitive Crime Control

Wayne A. Logan

Given the negative consequences of crime, it should come as no surprise that states will endeavor to make their dominions less hospitable to potential criminal actors. This predisposition, when played out on a national stage, would appear ripe for a dynamic in which states will seek to “out-tough” one another, leading to a spiral of detrimental competitiveness.

Doron Teichman, in an article recently appearing in these pages, advances just such a view. Teichman posits that the decentralized structure of America’s federalist system provides states with “an incentive to increasingly harshen” their crime control efforts, with the net result being excessive penalties and inefficient over-expenditures in state crime control efforts. He reaches this conclusion by wedding two distinct literatures: jurisdictional competition, based on the seminal work of Charles Tiebout, and crime displacement and spillover, a focus of theoretical criminology. Even more provocative is Teichman’s prescription for change. Running against a heavy tide of commentary condemning increased federal involvement in criminal justice, Teichman urges that the federal government serve as a “regulator” of the states so that they can “achieve uniformity” and thereby avoid “inefficient harshening.”

   //  VIEW PDF
& Other Current Events

Fall Submission Season

MLR’s Articles Office will open its fall submission season on Monday, August 18!  The Articles...

The Ninth Circuit's Treatment of Sexual Orientation: Defining “Rational Basis Review with Bite”

On February 10, Nevada's Democratic attorney general decided to stop defending the state's constitutional...

Inhibiting Intrastate Inequalities: A Congressional Approach to Ensuring Equal Opportunity to Finance Public Education

The United States has exhibited a strong commitment to public education throughout its history. The local...

War Is Governance: Explaining the Logic of the Laws of War from a Principal-Agent Perspective

What is the purpose of the international law on armed conflict, and why would opponents bent on destroying...

Tariffication of the Coastwise Trade Laws

The coastwise trade laws prohibit foreign vessels and mariners from transporting goods or passengers...
MAILING LIST
Sign Up to Join Our Mailing List