April 2008 Vol. 106 No. 6 THE REVIEW

Croley: Regulation and Public Interests: The Possibility of Good Regulatory Government

M. Elizabeth Magill

Temporary Accidents?

Regulation and Public Interests: The Possibility of Good Regulatory Government. By Steven P. Croley. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 2007. Pp. xii, 379. Cloth, $65; paper, $27.95.

There is no hidden agenda in Steven Croley’s new book. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s words appear in the book’s concluding pages. Administrative tribunals, Roosevelt claimed in 1940, leveled the playing field between “a powerful and concentrated interest” and “a diversified mass of individuals” (p. 304). Croley’s book likewise defends regulatory agencies from their modern-day public choice critics. And it does so for the reason Roosevelt identified: agencies are able to resist the demands of special interests and regulate on behalf of the public. Croley’s book is careful and scholarly, but it is also a spirited defense of regulatory government.

   //  VIEW PDF
& Other Current Events

Lost in Translation: The Accidental Origins of Bond v. United States

One of the unusual features of cases about the constitutionality of federal statutes is that they are...

Foreword: What Books on Law Should Be

I have thought it might be useful to our profession, and appropriate to a foreword to a collection of...

A Pragmatic Republic, If You Can Keep It

Creating the Administrative Constitution: The Lost One Hundred Years of American Administrative Law....

Classic Revisited – Frost for Lawyers: "The Best Thing That We're Put Here For's to See"

The Poetry of Robert Frost: The Collected Poems. Edited by Edward Connery Lathem....

Racial Templates

A Wicked War: Polk, Clay, Lincoln, and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico. By Amy S. Greenberg....
MAILING LIST
Sign Up to Join Our Mailing List