April 2008 Vol. 106 No. 6 THE REVIEW

Drumbl: Atrocity, Punishment, and International Law

Kevin Jon Heller

Deconstructing International Criminal Law

Atrocity, Punishment, and International Law. By Mark A. Drumbl. New York: Cambridge University Press. 2007. Pp. xv, 298. Cloth, $80; paper, $29.99.

After nearly fifty years of post-Nuremberg hibernation, international criminal tribunals have returned to the world stage with a vengeance. The Security Council created the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (“ICTY”) in 1993 and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (“ICTR”) in 1994. Hybrid domestic-international tribunals have been established in Sierra Leone (2000), East Timor (2000), Kosovo (2000), Cambodia (2003), Bosnia (2005), and Lebanon (2007). And, of course, the international community’s dream of a permanent tribunal was finally realized in 2002, when the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (“ICC”) entered into force.

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