August 2006 Vol. 104 No. 8 THE REVIEW

Information Asymmetries and the Rights to Exclude

Lior Jacob Strahilevitz

The American law generally regards the “bundle of rights” as property’s dominant metaphor. On this conception of property, ownership empowers an individual to control a particular resource in any number of ways. For example, he may use it, transfer it, exclude others from it, divide it, and perhaps even destroy it. The various rights in the bundle, however, are not equal in terms of importance. To the contrary, American courts and commentators have deemed the “right to exclude” foremost among the property rights, with the Supreme Court characterizing it as the “hallmark of a protected property interest” and leading property scholars describing the right as the core, or the essential element, of ownership. Yet for all its centrality, in the minds of courts and legal scholars, there is substantial conceptual confusion about the nature of the “right to exclude.” This confusion manifests itself in the form of inconsistent judicial opinions and unsatisfying commentary on those opinions.

   //  VIEW PDF
& Other Current Events

Foreword: What Books on Law Should Be

I have thought it might be useful to our profession, and appropriate to a foreword to a collection of...

A Pragmatic Republic, If You Can Keep It

Creating the Administrative Constitution: The Lost One Hundred Years of American Administrative Law....

Classic Revisited – Frost for Lawyers: "The Best Thing That We're Put Here For's to See"

The Poetry of Robert Frost: The Collected Poems. Edited by Edward Connery Lathem....

Racial Templates

A Wicked War: Polk, Clay, Lincoln, and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico. By Amy S. Greenberg....

Book Notice - Some Kind of Judge: Henry Friendly and the Law of Federal Courts

Henry Friendly, Greatest Judge of His Era. By David M. Dorsen. Foreword by Richard A....
MAILING LIST
Sign Up to Join Our Mailing List