May 2007 Vol. 105 No. 7 THE REVIEW

Proximate Cause in Constitutional Torts: Holding Interrogators Liable for Fifth Amendment Violations at Trial

Joel Flaxman

In 1996, a Texas trial court convicted eleven-year-old LaCresha Murray of injury to a child and gave her a twenty-five-year sentence. An appeals court overturned LaCresha’s conviction after she had spent three years in custody, finding that her confession should have been suppressed and not used at trial. After her release from custody, LaCresha filed a lawsuit in federal district court under 42 U.S.C. § 1983, seeking damages from the officers who, she claimed, had violated her Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination by eliciting the involuntary confession used at trial to convict her.

   //  VIEW PDF
& Other Current Events

Lost in Translation: The Accidental Origins of Bond v. United States

One of the unusual features of cases about the constitutionality of federal statutes is that they are...

Foreword: What Books on Law Should Be

I have thought it might be useful to our profession, and appropriate to a foreword to a collection of...

A Pragmatic Republic, If You Can Keep It

Creating the Administrative Constitution: The Lost One Hundred Years of American Administrative Law....

Classic Revisited – Frost for Lawyers: "The Best Thing That We're Put Here For's to See"

The Poetry of Robert Frost: The Collected Poems. Edited by Edward Connery Lathem....

Racial Templates

A Wicked War: Polk, Clay, Lincoln, and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico. By Amy S. Greenberg....
MAILING LIST
Sign Up to Join Our Mailing List