April 2013 Vol. 111 No. 6 THE REVIEW

What Ails the Law Schools?

Paul Horwitz

In January 2012, law professors from across the country arrived in Washington, D.C., for the annual conference of the Association of American Law Schools ("AALS"). It was an opportune moment. The legal economy was struggling. Graduates were begging for jobs and struggling with unprecedented levels of debt. The smart talk from the experts was that the legal economy was undergoing a fundamental restructuring.

For these and other reasons, law schools were under fire, from both inside and outside of the academy. Judges-including the keynote speaker at the AALS conference himself!-derided legal scholarship as useless. Law school deans called the economics of law school increasingly unsustainable. Legislators and litigators alike were looking into what law schools said and did. Professors registered their alarm in high and low places.

 

   //  VIEW PDF
& Other Current Events

Protecting Whistleblower Protections in the Dodd-Frank Act

In 2008, the United States fell into its worst economic recession in over seventy years. In response,...

A Comprehensive Administrative Solution to the Armed Career Criminal Act Debacle

For thirty years, the Armed Career Criminal Act ("ACCA") has imposed a fifteen-year mandatory minimum...

Rethinking the Timing of Capital Clemency

This Article reviews every capital clemency over the last four decades. It demonstrates that in the majority...

The Political Safeguards of Horizontal Federalism

For decades, we have debated whether "political safeguards" preserve healthy relations between the states...

A Solution to Michigan's Child Shackling Problem

Detained children routinely appear before Michigan's juvenile courts shackled with handcuffs, leg irons,...
MAILING LIST
Sign Up to Join Our Mailing List